Premium
Streaming Lab Beta
Sequencing Animations with Timeline
Tutorial
Beginner
30 Mins
Overview
Overview
You have completed 0% of this Tutorial.
1.
Why Animation?
2.
Animation Sequencing with Timeline
Summary
In the Streaming lab, you will use custom animation clips and the Timeline tool to add movement to your scene. In the Challenge, you will organize animations in your scene using Animator and Timeline.
By the end of the tutorial, you will understand the functions of Unity’s primary Animation tools––Animator, Animation, Timeline––and animate multiple objects, coordinating the animations of multiple objects at once in your project. Oh, and we will do all of this without writing a single line of code.
Topics we'll cover
Language
English
Recommended Unity Versions
2018.3
Tutorial
Sequencing Animations with Timeline
Streaming Lab Beta
This tutorial contains a Streaming Lab
The Streaming Lab takes 2-5 minutes to load. Launch the Lab to load it in a new tab, and return to continue this tutorial. When you get to the Streaming Lab step, your Lab should be ready. Note that you have 15 minutes to return to your Lab before you have to reload it.
Streaming Labs are currently in Beta and optimized for North American usage.
1.
Why Animation?
Animation brings the Unity scene to life. We use animation to bring pre-selected and designed movement to our digital world. Some examples of how we use animation are making a forklift move or having a door swing open on cue.
As a developer you can move objects in two ways:
  • Using C# code
  • Animation Clips (leaning on Unity’s built-in animation tools: Animator and Timeline)
Animation is an essential tool to bring autonomous movement to your scene, giving objects a life of their own. Used across the industry to increase immersion in XR scenes, animation can be used both as a communication tool and a tool to increase scene realism.
Unity offers multiple tools (discussed below) to create sequential actions (audio, video, object manipulation, lighting, etc.) without needing deep knowledge or background in computer programming. Although one could write a C# script to control objects and create more complicated, autonomous behaviors, Unity’s animation tools (Animation, Animator, and Timeline) can do the same work independent from coding. In other words, these animation tools can control an object’s position, scale, rotation, audio, video, lighting, and more.
What Will You Learn?
In the Basic module, we learned how to make animation clips. Now we will learn how to string animations together for more complicated, synchronized animated movement in our scenes.
In the Sandbox, you will use custom animation clips and the Timeline tool to add movement to your scene. In the Challenge, you will organize animations in your scene using Animator and Timeline.
By the end of the module, understand the functions of Unity’s primary Animation tools––Animator, Animation, Timeline––and animate multiple objects, coordinating the animations of multiple objects at once in your project. Oh, and we will do all of this without writing a single line of code.
Unity Topic List:
  1. Animator
  2. Animation Clips
  3. Timeline
  4. Package Manager
  5. Animation Window
  6. Playable Director

Streaming Lab Beta
2.
Animation Sequencing with Timeline
This Sandbox Lab is an introduction to Timeline and the Animator. Since we will be animating multiple objects simultaneously, we will coordinate those animations with Timeline.
We will make multiple animation clips for a truck and crane, and then synchronize those clips into an animation sequence with Timeline.
In this Lab, you will make an animation of a crane lowering its hook, animate a truck entering the scene, and then animate the crane grabbing and lifting the cargo load into the air.
The three animations include:
  • Crane animation lowering its hook
  • Crane animation turning and raising the cargo
  • Truck animation leaving the scene.
You will learn how to: Using Animation, you will learn how to:
  1. Animate the truck’s entrance, pick up, and departure
  2. Animate the crane’s rotation, hook drop, and equipment lift